Sharing Our Work for Social Change: Taking Action

Join us for the first event of a series presented by The History Center in Tompkins County and the Dorothy Cotton Institute titled “Sharing Our Stories of Action for Social Justice and Transformation.”

Series Kick-Off Event:

Sharing Our Work for Social Change: Taking Action
Saturday March 19th, 2:00 – 4:00 at The History Center in Tompkins County

(401 E. State St., Suite 100 — Gateway Plaza)

“Saturday will be the first of a series of community gatherings for sharing our personal narratives, and creating an archive of oral histories so that we can build the knowledge of how people achieve justice and effect change. No story is too short.”     Dorothy Cotton Institute

“Ithaca and Tompkins County have a long history of involvement in social movements and issues.”           The History Center

This series will encourage people in our communities to share their personal stories and oral histories that highlight individual contributions for working for social change across a broad range of issues and social movements. At this event, four panelists will share their work for change and address what they had to overcome and what sustained them. After the panel, everyone will be invited to meet in small groups to share their work for social change.

Panelists:

Carlos H. Gutierrez, Former Chilean Political Exile & Labor Community Organizer
Jhakeem Haltom,
Dean of Student Life, New Roots School

Mary Milne, Fabric Artist & Local Ribbon Coordinator, 1982-85
Joyce Muchan, Former Chair of the Ithaca LGBT Task Force

There will be future events to help community members learn from one another and to highlight that we can all choose to take action. This project will include oral histories will be captured to archive the richness of action and involvement of Tompkins County residents in a variety of social movements.

Co-sponsored by
The History Center in Tompkins County & The Dorothy Cotton Institute,
The John Henrik Clarke Africana Library & Cornell University Public Service Center

The Legacy Foundation of Tompkins County provided support for the series

For more information, contact Kayla Sewell at Community@TheHistoryCenter.net
or call
(607) 273-8284 x 227

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Jan Norman receives Award for Social Responsibility in Business

Announcement from the latest “Business Cents” Newsletter:

This year’s Jeff Furman Award for Social Responsibility in Business is long overdue:

Jan(72dpi)Jan Norman of Silk Oak and Ithacamade, whose businesses exemplify a commitment to socially-minded business practices, including being certified Living Wage Employers. Jan engages with the community in ways that promote sustainability and education, and she has worked tirelessly to make Ithaca a vibrant, living local economy.

Congratulations, Jan! You are a role model for the Building Bridges Network and you live the vision of a socially just, ecologically sound local economy.

Reimagining a Fair & Local Economy

Freeing Ourselves From Systems that Weaken & Divide Us

Through our scientific and technological genius, we have made of this world a neighborhood and yet we have not had the ethical commitment to make of it a brotherhood. But somehow, and in some way, we have got to do this…We are tied together in the single garment of destiny, caught in an inescapable network of mutuality …whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

Delivered by Martin Luther King Jr. over 45 years ago as an impassioned call for “Remaining Awake through a Great Revolution”, these words seem more relevant than ever to the linked economic, environmental and social calamities we face today. Our global economy and its effects on nearly every facet of our lives is increasingly seen as a root of these problems. With a warming climate and epic failures like the BP oil disaster and financial crisis, this system and its structures are looking catastrophically flawed and outdated. The “economic genius” of Frankensteinian creations like derivatives has turned our world economy into a shell game, with perhaps the worse yet to come.

Communities have become ground zero for a resource extraction model seeking to maximize short-term profits for distant stock holders while externalizing as many costs as possible. Those “externalities” include many of our own who are left behind as the divide between the haves and multiplying have-nots grows. Making matters worse, the reach and influence of the too-big-to-fail juggernauts responsible for these crises extends deep into our systems of governance, playing no small part in the recent government shut-down.

At the same time, a growing number of communities like our own are grappling with how to sustain basic civic infrastructure, including water, transportation, health, social services and educational systems. Put into place decades or centuries ago, many are now crumbling and we find ourselves without adequate means to maintain or replace them. Extreme events like Hurricanes Irene and Sandy, expected to increase in frequency, are also revealing a lack of resilience in our support systems and compromised landscapes.

We seem to be caught in a destructive feedback loop, unable to break free from a system that is continually reinforcing itself (with the help of bailouts and subsidies) while weakening our communities and endangering the planet. Some are wondering what alternatives might exist – how can we reinvent a new economy that serves, not consumes us?

You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.  -Buckminster Fuller

Unseen by some, another great revolution, or “reimagining” is already occurring. It is rising from communities like our own, leveraging the power of We to solve intractable problems collectively.  Here are some signs of and guideposts for this emergent and hopeful movement. Continue reading

TOMPKINS COUNTY JUDGE CANDIDATES FORUM

Wednesday, August 14 @ 6 pm

GIAC, 301 W. Court Street, Ithaca

“District Attorneys decide who to prosecute.  Judges decide the sentencing. You can decide who looks out fairly and justly for our community!”CLOC candidates poster

Sponsored by: Community Leaders Of Color, Latino Civic Association, Ithaca Asian American Association, and Shawn Greenwood Working Group

Black Farmers and Urban Growers

Please check out Black Farmers and Urban Growers and like them on Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/BlackUrbanGrowers . They have one of the greatest logos ever for their conference.

 About

Our mission is to engage people of African descent in critical food and farm-related issues that directly impact our health, communities, and economic security.
Mission

Our mission is to build networks and community support for growers in both urban and rural settings. Through education and advocacy around food and farm issues, we nurture collective black leadership to ensure we have a seat at the table. Find our more today at http://www.blackfarmersconf.org/ 

Company Overview
The Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference is presented by Black Urban Growers (BUGS), an organization of volunteers committed to building networks and community support for growers in both urban and rural settings. Through education and advocacy around food and farm issues, we nurture collective black leadership to ensure we have a seat at the table.
Based in the New York City Metropolitan area, Black Urban Growers’ founding members include representatives from the following grassroots groups, non-profit organizations as well as individuals from our communities:
Grassroots Groups
Brooklyn Rescue Mission – Brooklyn, NY
Community Vision Council – Brooklyn, NY
Garden of Happiness – Bronx, NY
La Familia Verde – Bronx, NY
La Finca Del Sur – Bronx, NY
Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, New York Chapter
Taqwa Community Farm – Bronx, NYNon-Profit OrganizationsCitizens Committee for New York City – Manhattan, NY
Green City Force – Brooklyn, NY
GreenThumb – Manhattan, NY
Heritage Radio – Online Radio Network
Isles, Inc. – Trenton, NJ
Just Food – Manhattan, NY
NYFood Museum – Manhattan, NY
Weeksville Heritage Center – Brooklyn, NY
West Harlem Initiative Neighborhood Garden Sustainability (WHINGS) – Manhattan, NY
WhyHunger – Manhattan, NY

Description
In November of 2009, Black Urban Growers began organizing and hosting a series of community events with the purpose of starting a conversation around food: Where does it come from? Who is providing it? Why don’t we see more black farmers at the farmers markets? What is the relationship between our individual health and the health of our communities, and why does it matter?Beginning with a fundraiser event in February of 2010, followed by a Community Forum that April, we’ve been inviting more and more people from our communities to engage in the conversation and together connect the dots between the health of our farmers and our collective health as a community.At the first annual Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Conference in November 2010, more than 500 attendees began building a national network that includes producers, consumers, and everyone in between in creating sustainable solutions. This vital project continued at the second annual conference in October 2011.

Cornell Civic Leader Fellowship Program is seeking for applications!

DEADLINE — July 5, 2013

Looking for funding and support  your program or project to the next level?

The Cornell Civic Leader Fellowship Program is designed to support your Community Based Initiative!

Apply today! Whether it’s a new initiative, or you are seeking to boost an ongoing project, the program provides funding and support in a collaborative and socially responsible atmosphere. Two community leaders involved in economic and community development efforts will be chosen as Civic Leader Fellows. Fellows will be awarded $5,000 for their project and invited to join the Cornell community as both learners and teachers for an academic year.

The Cornell Civic Leaders Fellowship Program is sponsored by the Cornell Public Service Center,  Engaged Learning + Research, and Community and Regional Development Institute (CaRDI).

For complete detail of the guidelines, application requirement and list of past Fellows, please visit our website: http://www.psc.cornell.edu/civic-fellows-leadership-program-1091.php